This image was made while filming for the Level 1 movie "Partly Cloudy" in Sun Valley, ID. After a long build, lots of reshaping and a bunch of flat landings Chris Logan decided this feature wasn't going to work as the hip it was intended to be.

Photos By: Tal Roberts    
   
 

HOMETOWN: Gig Harbor Washington /  Ketchum Idaho AGE: 33 years young  TRIPOD: Manfronto 290  FILTERS: A couple uv and polarizers  CAMERA BAGS: Dakine Sequence,  A Burton, and a small Lowepro  FLASH: Elinchrom Ranger, Ranger Quadra, Nikon sb80, sunpak 555 CAMERA BODY: Nikon d3  LENS: Nikon 24-70 2.8, Nikon 80-200 2.8, Nikon 16mm 2.8, Nikon 50mm 1.8, Nikon 85mm 1.8

Do you have a second job, or is  photography paying the bills now?
Nope. I have all my eggs in one basket and no backup plan.
 
Which is your favorite lens? Why?

I tend to like longer lenses best because the way they compress the background, but shooting the stuff I do the fisheye gets a lot of use too.

Among the gadgets that you own, is there something that you wish you hadn’t bought?
Before I moved to Ketchum I bought a complete darkroom and at the time I thought I was moving there for one winter. It has been sitting in my parent’s basement in Washington for 8 years now. I don’t really regret buying it, but I wish I was using it.

Tal Roberts

This pipe Colter Brehmer is sliding across pumps hot water from a river side springs up the street to somebody's backyard hot pool. I'm not sure what the job of the barbed wire is.

Plans for the season?
Probably spend a lot of time in the Idaho backcountry with the Smith Optics crew, and I plan on putting in a lot of days on resort at Sun Valley. That’s the standard season, but I have no idea until it happens.

How do you educate yourself to take better pictures?
By taking pictures and studying the results. I had a friend who I skated with when I was getting into photography, he worked at a camera shop in the mall and he would flow me film and process rolls for free.  He would tell me what was working and what wasn’t so, I was really lucky to be able to learn inexpensively in the beginning. I really owe a lot to him, but I’m bummed because we lost contact years ago when he moved and can’t get in touch.  I also read a lot about photography and force myself to try new ideas.

What type of reading do you do on a daily basis?
I like to read a lot of photography books. Right now I’m reading through Gregory Heisler’s “50 Portraits”, there is a lot of good info in there. I also try to read a lot of fiction, Kurt Vonnegut’s books seem to find their way off the shelf regularly. Lots of magazines, too.

Winter can wreck your flatground game. Unless you can find a heated water tank to keep the skills sharp. Taylor Crandall, 360 Flip.

Parker White's smooth style observed through a mud puddle.

Among your works, which one is your favorite? Why?
It’s tough to single out one, as it changes as my work improves. I tend to like the more artsy stuff, when it’s action, it’s usually the really simple tricks I like to shoot because I feel like I can put more thought into making those shots unique.

Whose work has influenced you most?
I started out shooting skateboarding so I looked up to skate photographers a lot. I still do, Brian Gaberman is one of my favorite photographers in any genre. I’m also inspired by a lot of people who aren’t photographers; people who are doing things that they are passionate about whether it’s making art or skateboarding or music or whatever.

I tend to like the more artsy stuff, when it’s action, it’s usually the really simple tricks I like to shoot because I feel like I can put more thought into making those shots unique.

Tim McChesney, a big jump and a lucky spot for a puddle. This was late in the spring in Sun Valley and it was really warm. It was amazing they the park crew was able to pull this off so well with the snow melting fast.

What is the one thing you wish you knew when you started taking photos?
That hindsight’s 20-20.

Can you explain your double exposure shots?
They are actually single exposures. It didn’t snow a ton last year, so I ended up shooting a lot of pipe and park, which got repetitive and inspired me to look for ways to make those shots feel different. So I went down to the glass shop and got some pieces of glass to experiment with. I am holding either a mirror or a prism in front of the lens to get that effect. It works best with a tripod and a real steady hand with the glass. They are shot digital but done all in-camera, in one frame.

Always aware of the light, Wyatt Caldwell picked out this bump to hammer a turn on our way home after a long day in the Idaho backcountry.

Pretty standard park shot on a weird feature on Dollar Mountain in Sun Valley with a little extra flair thrown in via prism.

What kind of tools do you use for post processing?
I do pretty much all my post work in Lightroom 5. I try to keep the post processing pretty simple I try to have an idea while shooting of how the final image will look. This helps keep the processing time down, but there is never any one click and you’re done with any image. My work flow could probably be a little more dialed, my organization could be better.

 I’m inspired by a lot of people who aren’t photographers; people who are doing things that they are passionate about whether it’s making art or skateboarding or music or whatever.

Left: Lighting backcountry shots can be really tough since strobes are so heavy to trek around with, luckily this pillow zone isn't far from the road and Pat Lee is always down to make a shot work. / Right: Mark Carter in his element.

Chase Josey: Early morning frontside air, Sun Valley, Idaho.


Photos BY: Tal Roberts

   
   
 

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